Panzer Fury • 2018 • episode "S1E1" Hitler's Last Stand

Category: History

The Allies must capture the Abbaye d Ardenne, which guards the city of Caen but is held by a notorious Panzer unit accused of horrific war crimes.

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Hitler's Last Stand • 2018 • 4 episodes •

Panzer Fury

The Allies must capture the Abbaye d Ardenne, which guards the city of Caen but is held by a notorious Panzer unit accused of horrific war crimes.

2018 • History

Nazi Fortress

Desperate to feed the Allied advance after D-Day, US forces target a deep water port in France during a month long siege against Nazi paratroopers.

2018 • History

Forest of Death

As winter sets in, US Rangers must capture Hill 400, a strategic peak on the German border.

2018 • Health

Enemy Allies

German and American soldiers fight together to save French VIP prisoners from Nazi troops.

2018 • History

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