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Part IV • 2019 • episode "4/4" Blue Planet Live

Category: Nature
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In the final programme of this week-long ocean health check, we find out what the future holds for the next generation of marine life and how we can help.

Blue Planet Live • 2019 • 4 episodes •

Part I

Chris Packham, Liz Bonnin and Steve Backshall explore our oceans and its wildlife, to find out how marine life is coping in the face of increasing environmental pressure.

2019 • Nature

Part II

In a race to find out what great pressures confront life in our ocean, the team continue their mission to investigate the effect human impact has had on our marine ecosystem.

2019 • Nature

Part III

As marine life around the world embarks on epic journeys across the planet’s oceans, we discover how ocean traffic, over-fishing and noise pollution could have an impact.

2019 • Nature

Part IV

In the final programme of this week-long ocean health check, we find out what the future holds for the next generation of marine life and how we can help.

2019 • Nature

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