Revelations and Revolutions • episode "S1E3" Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity

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How we finally came to understand the science of electricity.

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Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity • 3 episodes •

Spark

How pioneers unlocked electricity's mysteries and built strange instruments to create it.

Physics

The Age of Invention

How harnessing the link between magnetism and electricity transformed the world.

Physics

Revelations and Revolutions

How we finally came to understand the science of electricity.

Physics

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