The Emerald Band • 2012 • episode "S1E1" Secrets of Our Living Planet

Category: Nature

The amazing web of life centred on the Brazil nut tree is revealed.

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Secrets of Our Living Planet • 2012 • 4 episodes •

The Emerald Band

The amazing web of life centred on the Brazil nut tree is revealed.

2012 • Nature

The Magical Forest

Chris Packham looks at the annual miracle of the temperate forest.

2012 • Nature

Waterworlds

Chris Packham travels across the world to reveal the secrets of our watery habitats.

2012 • Nature

The Secret of the Savannah

In this episode, Chris reveals how the world's most spectacular grasslands flourish, despite being short of one essential nutrient - nitrogen. As it turns out, the secret lies with the animals. There are the white rhinos of Kenya that create nitrogen hotspots by trimming and fertilising the grass. They are drawn to these particular points by communal toilets or 'fecal facebooks', where they meet and greet each other. In the whistling acacia grasslands of Kenya, Chris reveals the amazing relationships between termites, geckos, ants, monkeys and giraffes that make these places so rich in wildlife

2012 • Nature

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