The Universe's Greatest Hits • 2016 • episode "S1E1" Space's Deepest Secrets

Category: Astronomy
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From the mission that saw Pluto for the first time to the Mars rovers, a new breed of explorers are risking their careers, and even their lives, to lead humanity to worlds we have never seen and tackle the mysteries of life itself.

Space's Deepest Secrets • 0 • 6 episodes •

The Universe's Greatest Hits

From the mission that saw Pluto for the first time to the Mars rovers, a new breed of explorers are risking their careers, and even their lives, to lead humanity to worlds we have never seen and tackle the mysteries of life itself.

2016 • Astronomy

Hunt for Dark Energy

Meet the scientists across the world on the hunt for dark energy, an unknown form of energy which is hypothesized to permeate all of space and may be accelerating the expansion of the universe.

2016 • Astronomy

Death of the Solar System

An exploration of the dramatic fate of our future descendants, the technology they'll need to survive the end of this world billions of years from now and our options for colonizing and starting again on a new planet somewhere far from Earth.

2016 • Astronomy

Alien Oceans

A soaring quest through the solar system’s exotic and hidden water realms, from the deep seas below the icy crust of Europa to the vast prehistoric oceans that once existed on Mars billions of years ago.

2016 • Astronomy

Secret History of the Voyager Mission

Voyager has had a profound effect on our knowledge of the cosmos. Its mission was supposed to last five years but remains ongoing, fundamentally changing our understanding of the solar system. Featuring contributions from key scientists, we’ll explore what’s been achieved and what happens next.

2016 • Astronomy

The Plot Against Gravity

The story of how a large aerospace company, BAE Systems, began a secret project to counter the force of gravity while NASA simultaneously ran a similar 'Breakthrough Propulsion Physics' program.

2016 • Astronomy

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Introduction to the Solar System

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Mercury

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How the Universe Built Your Car

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Do we live in a multiverse?

It has long been thought that our universe is all there is, but it is possible we may live in just one of many.

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