Timewarp • episode "4/6" Supernatural: The Unseen Powers of Animals

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Explores how animals sense time and how some can alter their metabolism for survival.

Supernatural: The Unseen Powers of Animals • 6 episodes •

Extrasensory Perception

Investigating extraordinary feats and strange powers of animals. A look at animals that possess senses more powerful than humans: sharks, dolphins, hippos, parrots, killer bees, rhinos, pelicans and elephants.

Nature

Outer Limits

Looks at animals capable of surviving in extreme conditions of temperature, drought and pressure.

Nature

Hidden Forces

Looks at the relationship of animals and plants to the invisible world of electricity, magnetism and electro-magnetic forces.

Nature

Timewarp

Explores how animals sense time and how some can alter their metabolism for survival.

Nature

The Paranormal

Looks at the unusual activities of animals including walking on water and pharmaceuticals.

Nature

Close Encounters

This programme explores the hidden ways our lives are entwined with the animal world.

Nature

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