Trouble in the Family: 1337-1360 • 2013 • episode "1/3" Chivalry and Betrayal: The Hundred Years War

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Edward III rips up the medieval rule book and crushes the flower of French knighthood at the Battle of Crecy with his low-born archers. His son, the Black Prince, conducts a campaign of terror, helping to bring France to her knees.

Chivalry and Betrayal: The Hundred Years War • 2013 • 2 episodes •

Trouble in the Family: 1337-1360

Edward III rips up the medieval rule book and crushes the flower of French knighthood at the Battle of Crecy with his low-born archers. His son, the Black Prince, conducts a campaign of terror, helping to bring France to her knees.

2013 • History

Agents of God: 1415-1453

Henry V has claimed the French crown for his heirs, but to secure it the English must conquer all of France. Potent French resistance comes in the most unlikely form of an illiterate, young peasant girl - Joan of Arc.

2013 • History

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