Rogue Planet • 2016 • episode "S1E3" • Doomsday: 10 Ways the World Will End

Category: Environment
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There are twice as many rogue planets as stars in the galaxy. So what might happen if a ringed planet the size of Neptune were on a collision course with Earth?

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