Coasts • 2001 • episode "8/8" Blue Planet I

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David Attenborough narrates a natural history of the oceans, examining how animals from in and around the sea use the constantly changing coastal areas.

Blue Planet I • 2001 • 10 episodes •

Introduction

The ocean's influence dominates the world's weather systems and supports an enormous range of life. This first episode demonstrates the sheer scale, power and complexity of the "Blue Planet".

2001 • Nature

The Deep

David Attenborough narrates a natural history of the oceans to uncover the strange, otherworldly creatures living in the depths of the ocean.

2001 • Nature

Open Ocean

David Attenborough narrates a natural history of the oceans. The deadly game of hide-and-seek played by the sea's charismatic hunters - whales, shark and billfish.

2001 • Nature

Frozen Seas

A look at the survival techniques of creatures that endure the harsh conditions of the Arctic and Antarctic.

2001 • Nature

Seasonal Seas

David Attenborough narrates a natural history of the oceans, exploring the richest waters on Earth, where the annual cycle of the sun drives an explosion of life.

2001 • Nature

Coral Seas

Developed over centuries, coral reefs house fragile ecosystems, but they too have to fight to survive.

2001 • Nature

Tidal Seas

As snails surf the waves in pursuit of a meal, how do the tides create opportunities for marine life?

2001 • Nature

Coasts

David Attenborough narrates a natural history of the oceans, examining how animals from in and around the sea use the constantly changing coastal areas.

2001 • Nature

Making Waves [Making of]

Revealing the titanic efforts behind Blue Planet, this diary reveals the skills and dedication of the film makers.

2001 • Nature

Deep Trouble [Extra]

Dr Martha Holmes looks at man's influence on the oceans. Is there a solution so that we can save our seas or is it too late to get us out of Deep Trouble?

2001 • Nature

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