Creation • 2017 • episode "1/2" Brian Cox: Life Of A Universe

Category: Astronomy
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Professor Brian Cox probes our moment of creation. How did our Universe come into existence? Was there a time before the Big Bang? Do our laws of physics inexorably lead to the existence of us?

Brian Cox: Life Of A Universe • 0 • 2 episodes •

Creation

Professor Brian Cox probes our moment of creation. How did our Universe come into existence? Was there a time before the Big Bang? Do our laws of physics inexorably lead to the existence of us?

2017 • Astronomy

End of Days

Professor Brian Cox tells the biggest story of them all. Inspired by the Southern Sky as he travels Australia, Brian reveals our very latest understanding about how the Universe began & how it will end.

2017 • Astronomy

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