From Deserts to Grasslands • 2019 • episode "5/8" Our Planet

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Cameras follow desert elephants seeking sustenance, bison roaming North American grasslands and caterpillars living the good life underground.

Our Planet • 2019 • 8 episodes •

One Planet

Witness the planet's breathtaking diversity -- from seabirds carpet-bombing the ocean to wildebeests eluding the wild dogs of the Serengeti.

2019 • Nature

Frozen Worlds

On the unforgiving frontier of climate change, polar bears, walruses, seals and penguins find their icy Edens in peril.

2019 • Nature

Jungles

Jungles and rainforests are home to an incredible variety of species like preening birds, intelligent orangutans and remarkably ambitious ants.

2019 • Nature

Coastal Seas

From fearsome sharks to lowly urchins, 90 percent of marine creatures live in coastal waters. Protecting these habitats is a battle humanity must win.

2019 • Nature

From Deserts to Grasslands

Cameras follow desert elephants seeking sustenance, bison roaming North American grasslands and caterpillars living the good life underground.

2019 • Nature

The High Seas

Venture into the deep, dark and desolate oceans that are home to an abundance of beautiful -- and downright strange -- creatures.

2019 • Nature

Fresh Water

The need for fresh water is as strong as ever. However, the supply is becoming increasingly unpredictable for all manner of species.

2019 • Nature

Forests

Examine the fragile interdependence that exists between forests' wide variety of residents, including bald eagles, hunting dogs and Siberian tigers.

2019 • Nature

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The Last Frontier

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To the Ends of the Earth

Our journey begins with David at the North Pole, as the sun returns after six months of darkness. We follow a pair of courting polar bears, which reveal a surprisingly tender side. Next stop is the giant Greenland ice cap, where waterfalls plunge into the heart of the ice and a colossal iceberg carves into the sea. Humpback whales join the largest gathering of seabirds on earth to feast in rich Alaskan waters. Further south, the tree line marks the start of the Taiga forest, containing one third of all trees on earth. Here, 25 of the world's largest wolves take on formidable bison prey. At the other end of our planet, the Antarctic begins in the Southern Ocean where surfing penguins struggle to escape a hungry sea-lion and teams of orcas create giant waves to wash seals from ice floes -a filming first. Diving below the ice, we discover prehistoric giants, including terrifying sea spiders and woodlice the size of dinner plates. Above ground, crystal caverns ring the summit of Erebus, the most southerly volcano on earth. From here we retrace the routes of early explorers across the formidable Antarctic ice-cap - the largest expanse of ice on our planet. Finally, we rejoin David at the South Pole, exactly one hundred years after Amundsen then Scott were the first humans to stand there

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The Making Of

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Mountains of the Deep

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