Indonesia • episode "2/3" Equator with Simon Reeve

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In Indonesia, Simon visits a village of sea gypsies and meets tribespeople who want to adopt him.

Equator with Simon Reeve • 0 • 3 episodes •

Africa

Abandoned in a rainforest in Gabon and greeted by circumcisers in Kenya, Simon's journey gets underway.

Nature

Indonesia

In Indonesia, Simon visits a village of sea gypsies and meets tribespeople who want to adopt him.

Nature

Latin America

After surviving the most dangerous region in Colombia, Simon is nearly swallowed by a tidal wave in Brazil.

Nature

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