Man's Best Friend • 2016 • episode "1/3" Secret Life of Dogs

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A look at how dogs have become part of human life and the closest of companions. An example of this special relationship is the amazing story of a cliff-diving Jack Russell.

Secret Life of Dogs • 2016 • 3 episodes •

Working Like a Dog

How and why dogs have become such good working companions, including Midge, the world's first police Chihuahua, and Joey, a sheepdog from the Cotswolds. Mother-of-four Toni Curtis gives her remarkable account of the fateful day when she was swept out to sea off the north coast of Wales and how she owes her life to the Newfoundland dog that saved her life..

2016 • Nature

We Are Family

While dogs are said to share more than 99 per cent of their DNA with grey wolves, recent research has indicated that this link might actually be the key to why dogs have become the perfect family pet. The pack mentality of their lupine ancestors remains in domestic dogs, inspiring what seems to be a fierce loyalty to their human families,

2016 • Nature

Man's Best Friend

A look at how dogs have become part of human life and the closest of companions. An example of this special relationship is the amazing story of a cliff-diving Jack Russell.

2016 • Nature

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