Meat Eaters • 1998 • episode "S1E4" The Life of Birds

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Birds eat more than berries; this episode takes a look at birds that eat meat.

The Life of Birds • 1998 • 9 episodes •

To Fly or Not to Fly?

The series begins with an in-depth look at flightless birds around the world.

1998 • Nature

The Mastery of Flight

The focus turns to the mastery of flight, from the science of gravity to the ability of birds to cover extremely long distances.

1998 • Nature

The Insatiable Appetite

Discovering the role of beaks within various species of birds.

1998 • Nature

Meat Eaters

Birds eat more than berries; this episode takes a look at birds that eat meat.

1998 • Nature

Fishing for a Living

Cameras follow birds as they dive into fresh and salt waters for their meals.

1998 • Nature

Signals and Songs

The myth that birds only sing for pleasure is destroyed as birdsongs become known as ways of communication.

1998 • Nature

Finding Partners

Male birds show off in the exotic ritual of mating.

1998 • Nature

The Demands of the Egg

Laying eggs and keeping nests are two things that keep birds grounded.

1998 • Nature

The Limits of Endurance

Left to their own devices, birds have reached almost all ends of the Earth - still, humans can do many things to help their feathered friends.

1998 • Nature

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Should We Close Our Zoos

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