The Insatiable Appetite • 1998 • episode "S1E3" The Life of Birds

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Discovering the role of beaks within various species of birds.

The Life of Birds • 1998 • 10 episodes •

To Fly or Not to Fly?

The series begins with an in-depth look at flightless birds around the world.

1998 • Nature

The Mastery of Flight

The focus turns to the mastery of flight, from the science of gravity to the ability of birds to cover extremely long distances.

1998 • Nature

The Insatiable Appetite

Discovering the role of beaks within various species of birds.

1998 • Nature

Meat Eaters

Birds eat more than berries; this episode takes a look at birds that eat meat.

1998 • Nature

Fishing for a Living

Cameras follow birds as they dive into fresh and salt waters for their meals.

1998 • Nature

Signals and Songs

The myth that birds only sing for pleasure is destroyed as birdsongs become known as ways of communication.

1998 • Nature

Finding Partners

Male birds show off in the exotic ritual of mating.

1998 • Nature

The Demands of the Egg

Laying eggs and keeping nests are two things that keep birds grounded.

1998 • Nature

The Problems of Parenthood

Raising children is no easier in the air as it is on the ground, as bird parents care for, defend, and even kill their young.

1998 • Nature

The Limits of Endurance

Left to their own devices, birds have reached almost all ends of the Earth - still, humans can do many things to help their feathered friends.

1998 • Nature

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