Nowhere to Hide (Plains) • 2015 • episode "5/7" The Hunt

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A look at predator and prey strategies in the open arenas of desert and grassland.

The Hunt • 2015 • 7 episodes •

The Hardest Challenge

This opening episode reveals the extraordinary strategies used by both predators and prey.

2015 • Nature

In the Grip of the Seasons (Arctic)

How do polar predators face the challenges of hunting in the most seasonal place on Earth?

2015 • Nature

Hide and Seek (Forests)

Predators and their prey hunt and escape in the dense and complex world of the forest.

2015 • Nature

Hunger at Sea (Oceans)

Revealing the strategies predators use to hunt for prey in the big blue.

2015 • Nature

Nowhere to Hide (Plains)

A look at predator and prey strategies in the open arenas of desert and grassland.

2015 • Nature

Race Against Time (Coasts)

Predators hunt on the dynamic border between land and sea, where chances are brief.

2015 • Nature

Living with Predators (Conservation)

Looking at the planet's top predators through the eyes of scientists trying to save them.

2015 • Nature

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