Part 1 • 2016 • episode "1/4" Mary Beard's Ultimate Rome: Empire Without Limit

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In this first episode, Mary Beard reaches back to the myths and legends of the origins of Rome to gain an insight into the deep-rooted psyche of the people of Rome - a city born through fratricide and rape.

Mary Beard's Ultimate Rome: Empire Without Limit • 0 • 4 episodes •

Part 1

In this first episode, Mary Beard reaches back to the myths and legends of the origins of Rome to gain an insight into the deep-rooted psyche of the people of Rome - a city born through fratricide and rape.

2016 • History

Part 2

In the second episode, Mary Beard explores the physical world of the Roman Empire, and finds surprising parallels with our own world.

2016 • History

Part 3

In the third episode Mary takes an in-depth look at the question of identity and citizenship within the Roman Empire. What did it mean to be, or to become, Roman, and how did the very different parts of the empire react to Roman rule?

2016 • History

Part 4

Why, and how, did the Roman Empire fall? Surveying the massive walls and fortifications of Britain and Germany, she discovers an empire under pressure, struggling to control its borders.

2016 • History

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