Part IV • 2005 • episode "S1E4" Amazon Abyss

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The team has come to the very deepest part of the jungle, where streams contain the richest life, as well as danger, from four-metre caiman and the electric eel - a fish with a 600 volt shock.

Amazon Abyss • 2005 • 5 episodes •

Part I

Hunting for it in the piranha-infested waters looks like no fun at all, but some of the images we see of astonished fish along the way are brilliant.

2005 • Nature

Part II

The team are on a quest to find a fish that talks and the candiru - a parasitic catfish notorious for invading the human body. Kate heads deep into the jungle to film a rare freshwater dolphin and track down the elusive giant otter.

2005 • Nature

Part III

Mike and his team confront an armour-plated catfish, discover a 45-metre hole in the riverbed and come face to face with an anaconda.

2005 • Nature

Part IV

The team has come to the very deepest part of the jungle, where streams contain the richest life, as well as danger, from four-metre caiman and the electric eel - a fish with a 600 volt shock.

2005 • Nature

Part V

In the climax of the expedition, the team prepares to explore a 100-meter chasm at the very bottom of the river. Underwater robots take cameras down the abyss and find the deep water flesh-feeding candiru.

2005 • Nature

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