Slimming Down • 2017 • episode "4/6" A User's Guide to Cheating Death

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Obesity is one of America's biggest public health concerns. Two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. The pressure to lose weight is intense and many are turning to surgical means to achieve results.

A User's Guide to Cheating Death • 2017 • 6 episodes •

Detox

What does it take to flush all the bad stuff from your body after a week-long bender? Or after several years of eating junk food? Can you atone for your health sins and start fresh?

2017 • Health

Fountain of Youth

Youth may be wasted on the young, but luckily, you can buy it back. People are using everything from face-lifts to second skin tech to keep their youthful advantage. However, with so many unproven therapies on the market, how many actually work?

2017 • Health

Genetic Revolution

DNA testing is becoming more and more common. People are making important health and life decisions based off this data, despite these tests being largely inaccurate.

2017 • Health

Slimming Down

Obesity is one of America's biggest public health concerns. Two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. The pressure to lose weight is intense and many are turning to surgical means to achieve results.

2017 • Health

The Natural Way

Growing distrust in GMOs, pharmaceuticals and non-natural solutions has pushed families to seek more 'natural' approaches to medical issues - sometimes with fatal consequences.

2017 • Health

Scienceploitation

Series Final. For those suffering from a chronic illness or degenerative disease, our rapidly evolving world is offering more promise for a cure than ever before. But with so many treatment options and so much conflicting information available, it's also becoming more difficult for those suffering to make critical treatment decisions.

2017 • Health

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