Travelling • 1995 • episode "1/6" Private Life of Plants

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Using time-lapse photography this episode examines the ways in which plants travel from place to place in search of a new area to grow in.

Private Life of Plants • 1995 • 6 episodes •

Travelling

Using time-lapse photography this episode examines the ways in which plants travel from place to place in search of a new area to grow in.

1995 • Nature

Growing

This episode shows the ways in which plants defend themselves against animals, and grow in search of sunlight, nutrients and water, all the elements needed to survive.

1995 • Nature

Flowering

This instalment looks at the ways in which plants procreate. Examining how plants use brightly coloured flowers and sweet scents to lure animals to them so they can spread their seeds to other flowers.

1995 • Nature

The Social Struggle

This episode examines how plants either share environments harmoniously or compete for dominance within them. It looks at the ways in which plants have to fight to survive, using any means available, be it excessive growth, capitalizing on disaster or even courting.

1995 • Nature

Living Together

The fifth programme explores the alliances formed between the animal and plant worlds. It examines the ways in which plants live together and rely on each other. Whether living together in harmony, relying on each other for homes, protection or food, or living off each other, by strangling or otherwise destroying each other in a bid to survive.

1995 • Nature

Surviving

We look at the ways in which plants have adapted to survive in the harshest climates on Earth. Whether in the driest, hottest deserts or the coldest Arctic wastes, plants have come up with some ingenious ways of surviving, including eating animals and actually caring for their offspring.

1995 • Nature

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