A Place Like Hell • 2016 • episode "S2E3" Volcanic Odysseys

Category: Economics
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Indonesia is one of the most volcanically active countries in the world--the island of Java alone has 45 active volcanoes, which could erupt at any time. Descend into some of the world's most volatile craters with scientist Tom Pfeiffer, who is hell-bent on photographing rare volcanic phenomenon.

Volcanic Odysseys • 0 • 5 episodes •

Indonesia Islands of Fire

Volcanologist Tom Pfeiffer and his team are embarking on their most daring adventure yet--visiting and photographing two remote Indonesian volcanoes, among the 20 most active in the world. Join a tense journey into the heart of one of nature's most dramatic and unpredictable natural phenomena, one that will test this experienced crew of scientists and native guides.

2016 • Environment

Fires of Don Goyo

As part of the connecting landmass between North and South America, Mexico has long been at the center of a tectonic tug of war spanning millennia. The result is two of the world's largest, most active volcanoes--the rumbling Popocatepetl and the menacing Volcano De Colima--whose vengeful displays of wrath are increasing in frequency. Could a cataclysmic eruption be just around the corner?

2016 • Environment

A Place Like Hell

Indonesia is one of the most volcanically active countries in the world--the island of Java alone has 45 active volcanoes, which could erupt at any time. Descend into some of the world's most volatile craters with scientist Tom Pfeiffer, who is hell-bent on photographing rare volcanic phenomenon.

2016 • Economics

Restless Giants

Japan has more than 100 active volcanoes--two in particular may be on the verge of unleashing a devastating sequence of deadly eruptions and secondary earthquake activity. Join intrepid volcanologist Tom Pfeiffer's dangerous and exhilarating journey to the foot of these angry giants.

2016 • Environment

In the Path of a Volcano

Venture into the danger zone of two volcanic craters posing widely divergent threats. Hawaii's Kilauea is a shield volcano that threatens communities with its slow-but-relentless lava flow, while the Sumatran Sinabung is a stratovolcano delivering carnage via a sudden and explosive surge of superheated gas and rock.

2016 • Environment

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