Aflocalypse Now • 2019 • episode "S1E4" Nature's Strangest Mysteries: Solved

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A look at why a skunk would do a handstand, why 5,000 birds fell from the sky in Arkansas, and what would make a frog flash like a lighthouse.

Nature's Strangest Mysteries: Solved • 2019 • 20 episodes •

Sparkly Spider

A look at what would dare take on the ocean's deadliest predator, why a spider lights up like a Christmas tree, and why a wild animal begins to deliver unwanted newspapers like a paperboy.

2019 • Nature

Skyscraper Raccoon

A look at why a raccoon would scale a 25-story skyscraper, why one mother duck would have a super-sized flock of 76 ducklings, and what would motivate a bird to feed a school of fish.

2019 • Nature

Held Hostage by a Humpback

A look at why a humpback whale would hold a diver hostage, how a colony of 1.5 million animals hide from the world in plain sight, and how a surprising stash of acorns could disrupt a whole town.

2019 • Nature

Aflocalypse Now

A look at why a skunk would do a handstand, why 5,000 birds fell from the sky in Arkansas, and what would make a frog flash like a lighthouse.

2019 • Nature

Unscrambling Eggs

A look at if fish really can predict earthquakes and why eggs are egg shaped.

2019 • Nature

Zombie Spider

A look at the possibility that zombie spiders are real and why would a pod of beluga whales adopt a unicorn of the sea.

2019 • Nature

Octopus Houdini

A look at how a bird could sing without using its voice and how an octopus could simply disappear from his aquarium tank.

2019 • Nature

Critter Culprit

A look at what could make an animal vanish into thin air, what could cause the sea to take on an eerie glow, and what event would bring killer whales together in huge numbers.

2019 • Nature

Animal Vandals

A look at what animals are breaking into thousands of cars every year, how ants form a ten-foot bridge using only their bodies, and why did the fish cross the road.

2019 • Nature

Crow Crime Scene

A look at how spiders covered a town in webs overnight and why a lake in South America is the lightning capital of the world.

2019 • Nature

Big Cat Screaming Match

Is it possible that a snake could exist totally undetected? What has brought this big cat fight to ear piercing decibels? Why is this lone dolphin getting muddy?

2019 • Nature

Snowboarding Crow

How did a moose get stuck in an apple tree? Why is a crow snowboarding on a jam jar lid? Is Yellowstone's super volcano about to erupt?

2019 • Nature

Cuddly Shark

A look at what would cause a ferocious tiger shark to cuddle up with a diver and why pigs are swimming in the Caribbean; and what mysterious blobs have washed up by the thousands on the shores of Oregon.

2019 • Nature

Disco Spider

A look at why some spiders disco dance; a mysterious creature is preying on Europe's sheep; a whole town is engulfed by bubbling foam.

2019 • Nature

Stripless Zebra

A look at why goats risk life and limb to climb an almost vertical dam wall; a zebra has no stripes; a school of fish swarm a diver.

2019 • Nature

Scorpion Night Lights

A look at why a leopard let its dinner escape; an ominous dark mass looming over an Icelandic lake; some scorpions glow in the dark.

2019 • Nature

Unicorn of the Sea

Narwhals are the unicorns of the sea, but what is the point of those tusks? What could swallow 50-foot trees in seconds? What animal has changed the face of Yellowstone?

2019 • Nature

Rattleless Rattlesnake

Where would you go to find an enchanted underwater forest? How come some Mexican rattlesnakes have lost their rattle? And why does an Indian elephant look like its smoking cigarettes?

2019 • Nature

Octopus Throwdown

A look at why a seal throw an octopus at a kayaker; why a moth is drinking from the eye of a bird in the Amazon jungle and what surprising creature has been leaping out of the Irish Sea.

2019 • Nature

Alligator Bodyguards

A look at how a dung beetle standing on its head can roll a ball in a straight line; if egrets ever regret hanging out next to hungry alligators; and what ghostly creature was caught on camera 3000 feet below the ocean's surface.

2019 • Nature

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