Endless Forms Most Beautiful • episode "3/5" Wonders of Life

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In this film Brian asks how a lifeless cosmos can produce a planet of such varied biology.

Wonders of Life • 5 episodes •

What is Life

Professor Brian Cox journeys to South-East Asia to understand how life first began.

Nature

Expanding Universe

Prof Brian Cox visits the USA retelling evolutionary history and the origin of the senses.

Nature

Endless Forms Most Beautiful

In this film Brian asks how a lifeless cosmos can produce a planet of such varied biology.

Nature

Size Matters

In this episode, Brian travels round Australia to explore the physics of the size of life.

Nature

Home

Brian Cox considers what it is about our world that makes it a home for life.

Nature

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