The Great Feast • episode "6/6" Nature's Great Events

Category: Nature
Share:
Download:

Whales and sea lions alike journey to the seas off Alaska to feed on the plankton bloom.

Nature's Great Events • 0 • 6 episodes •

The Great Melt

The summer melt of Arctic ice provides opportunities for millions of animals.

Nature

The Great Salmon Run

A look at the annual return of millions of salmon to the streams where they were born.

Nature

The Great Migration

The story of a lion family's struggle to survive until the return of the great migration.

Nature

The Great Tide

A look at the sardine run, which happens each winter along the South African coast.

Nature

The Great Flood

The great flood in the Okavango turns 4,000 square miles of arid plains into a wetland.

Nature

The Great Feast

Whales and sea lions alike journey to the seas off Alaska to feed on the plankton bloom.

Nature

You might also like

Cat Talk

In the final episode of this groundbreaking scientific study, Liz Bonnin and a team of scientists reveal the secret language of our cats, the surprising conversations they have when we are asleep, and why they meow to us but not each other. We rig a house with cameras and cat trackers to discover if four cats living under one roof all get on as well as we would like to think. And we find out why living alongside us is making life difficult for our 21st-century cats.

2014 • Cat WatchNature

How to Build a Dinosaur

Reconstructing a dinosaur skeleton for a museum is a balance between art and science - but getting that balance right is a tricky diplomatic, as well as scientific, process. Presenter and anatomist Dr. Alice Roberts follows the reconstruction of L.A.'s Natural History Museum's 2011 dinosaur exhibit.

2011 • Nature

David Attenborough's Ant Mountain

David Attenborough travels to the Jura Mountains in the Swiss Alps, to find out about one of the largest animal societies in the world, where over a billion ants live in peace.

2017 • Nature

Theme and Variation

This episode continues the study of mammals, and particularly those whose young gestate inside their bodies. Attenborough asks why these have become so varied and tries to discover the common theme that links them. Examples of primitive mammals that are still alive today include the treeshrew, the desman and the star-nosed mole. Insect eaters vary enormously from the aardvark, giant anteater and pangolin to those to which much of this programme is devoted: the bats, of which there are nearly 1,000 different species. These took to flying at night, and its possible that they evolved from treeshrews that jumped from tree to tree, in much the same way as a flying squirrel.

1979 • Life on EarthNature

Courting

This edition looks at the various methods employed by species to attract a mate, including whales that sing "songs", hamsters that emit an odour, and manakins that do acrobatic dances.

1990 • Trials of LifeNature

The human microbiome and what we do to it

Did you know that you and I are only 1% human — we've 90 trillion cells which don't belong to us. Yes we are more bacteria than human.

Nature