The Great Feast • episode "6/6" Nature's Great Events

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Whales and sea lions alike journey to the seas off Alaska to feed on the plankton bloom.

Nature's Great Events • 0 • 6 episodes •

The Great Melt

The summer melt of Arctic ice provides opportunities for millions of animals.

Nature

The Great Salmon Run

A look at the annual return of millions of salmon to the streams where they were born.

Nature

The Great Migration

The story of a lion family's struggle to survive until the return of the great migration.

Nature

The Great Tide

A look at the sardine run, which happens each winter along the South African coast.

Nature

The Great Flood

The great flood in the Okavango turns 4,000 square miles of arid plains into a wetland.

Nature

The Great Feast

Whales and sea lions alike journey to the seas off Alaska to feed on the plankton bloom.

Nature

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