The War Leader • 2018 • episode "2/2" Adolf Hitler The Itinerary

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Harald Sandner continues his study of Adolf Hitler as he seizes control of Germany and plunges the European continent into the bloodiest conflict the world has ever seen. Harald meticulously notes every success and failure as the world's powers come together to put an end to this chapter in history.

Adolf Hitler The Itinerary • 2018 • 2 episodes •

The Ascent of a Criminal

Harald Sandner, a history enthusiast, has traced Adolf Hitler's early life. From his childhood home, through his relationship with his family, the challenges he endured as a young man, and the home he made for himself in the German military. Follow the world's greatest murderer's rise to power.

2018 • History

The War Leader

Harald Sandner continues his study of Adolf Hitler as he seizes control of Germany and plunges the European continent into the bloodiest conflict the world has ever seen. Harald meticulously notes every success and failure as the world's powers come together to put an end to this chapter in history.

2018 • History

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