Africa • 2018 • episode "2/3" Amazing Monkeys

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Witness Africa's monkeys and apes and see how they evolved into the world's biggest, strongest, and smartest primates.

Amazing Monkeys • 2018 • 3 episodes •

Asia

Span the jungles, beaches, and snowy landscapes of Asia and come face-to-face with its remarkable variety of primates.

2018 • Nature

Africa

Witness Africa's monkeys and apes and see how they evolved into the world's biggest, strongest, and smartest primates.

2018 • Nature

The Americas

Meet leaping acrobats, nut-cracking wizards, and Earth's loudest land animal as we celebrate primates of the Americas.

2018 • Nature

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