Are We Really 99% Chimp? MinuteEarth

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It's common knowledge that humans share 99% of their DNA with chimpanzees. But is it true?

MinuteEarth • 2015 • 2 episodes •

Are We Really 99% Chimp?

It's common knowledge that humans share 99% of their DNA with chimpanzees. But is it true?

Health

Is Climate Change Just A Lot Of Hot Air?

How can global warming of less than 1 degree Celsius drive extreme weather? You might need to look beneath the surface (of the ocean) for the answer.

2015 • Environment

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