Latest • 36 videos

The Pioneers

Many clinical trials target the nation's most acute health issues. With deaths from liver disease soaring by 40 per cent in a decade, more and more patients are waiting for vital liver transplants. There is a shortage of organ donors and many donated organs are rejected as only those in excellent condition are considered suitable for a transplant procedure. Surgeons Richard Laing and Thamara Perera are part of a team at QEHB trialling a revolutionary way to tackle this crisis, by maximising the number of donor organs that can be safely re-used. The film follows the trial every step of the way, as Richard receives a donor liver that would usually be rejected and tries to prove it is viable for transplant by rejuvenating and testing it on a perfusion machine. This machine sustains the liver by mimicking the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients an organ receives inside a live, healthy human body. Once the donor liver has proved itself fit for transplant, the surgical team start to remove grandmother Connie O'Driscoll's severely diseased liver. Once the donor liver has been disconnected from the perfusion machine, they have just 20 minutes to place it in Connie's body and plumb it into the complex and delicate network of hepatic blood vessels.

3/3Surgeons: At the Edge of Life • 2018 • Health

Last Chance Saloon

Two procedures so formidable, they would not have been attempted even a few years ago. Surgical teams at the Queen Elizabeth are constantly pushing the limits of what is possible. But despite state-of-the-art diagnostic scanning, sometimes cancer surgeons don't know exactly what they are up against until they open the patient up on the operating table. Even with the most meticulous planning, sometimes they must resort to taking critical decisions live in the theatre. 74-year-old Jasmine Harkness has been referred to the specialist sarcoma unit with a vast tumour in her abdomen, weighing more than three stone - a third of her total body weight. It is consuming her, displacing organs including her stomach and liver. Unless it can be removed, she has just four weeks to live. Sarcoma specialists Sam Ford and Professor David Gourevitch can't be sure whether they will be able to save Jasmine until they open her up and inspect her anatomy. Such is the risk of this surgery - five years ago they would not have embarked on this intervention. Sue Sinclair, lead anaesthetist and matriarch of theatre, keeps the others in check - working alongside them as they battle to detach the tumour from Jasmine's organs and blood vessels, and remove it intact. Whenever it presses heavily on vital blood vessels, Jasmine's blood pressure plummets, placing her life in grave danger. It will take unwavering focus to keep her alive. The tumour has grown so invasively that it has crushed and displaced Jasmine's internal organs. Sam and David have a puzzle on their hands to identify what and where everything is. At times, dark humour is the only way to release the tension as they grapple with blood, guts and mind-boggling complexity.

2/3Surgeons: At the Edge of Life • 2018 • Health

The Longest Day

Specialist maxillofacial surgeons Tim Martin and Sat Parmar prepare for a marathon operation on 53-year-old Teresa. Four weeks ago, Teresa was diagnosed with a fast-growing cancerous tumour in her face and she will die within weeks unless it is removed. The procedure involves radical surgery to the entire right-hand side of her face, and means she will lose both her upper jaw and right eye. It is an enormous undertaking for Teresa, and for Tim and Sat, too. Using 3D imaging, the team plan how to remove the tumour and, most importantly, how they will rebuild Teresa's face. Tim and Sat are all too aware that whilst removing the tumour will save her life, it will be devastating if she is left disfigured and unable to face the world. To give her the best possible outcome, they intend to fill the cavity left in Teresa's face with a section of bone and muscle removed from her hip, using a 3D-printed plastic guide that helps them cut out the correct shape bone.

1/3Surgeons: At the Edge of Life • 2018 • Health

The Limits of Endurance

Left to their own devices, birds have reached almost all ends of the Earth - still, humans can do many things to help their feathered friends.

S1E10The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

The Problems of Parenthood

Raising children is no easier in the air as it is on the ground, as bird parents care for, defend, and even kill their young.

S1E9The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

The Demands of the Egg

Laying eggs and keeping nests are two things that keep birds grounded.

S1E8The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

Finding Partners

Male birds show off in the exotic ritual of mating.

S1E7The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

Signals and Songs

The myth that birds only sing for pleasure is destroyed as birdsongs become known as ways of communication.

S1E6The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

Fishing for a Living

Cameras follow birds as they dive into fresh and salt waters for their meals.

S1E5The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

Meat Eaters

Birds eat more than berries; this episode takes a look at birds that eat meat.

S1E4The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

The Insatiable Appetite

Discovering the role of beaks within various species of birds.

S1E3The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

The Mastery of Flight

The focus turns to the mastery of flight, from the science of gravity to the ability of birds to cover extremely long distances.

S1E2The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

To Fly or Not to Fly?

The series begins with an in-depth look at flightless birds around the world.

S1E1The Life of Birds • 1998 • Nature

Taking Center Stage — Cock of the Rock, Suriname

We all crave attention but one bird goes the extra mile to rise above the flock. Come with us to the rain forests of South America's smallest country Suriname to catch a very special performance of the male Guianan cock of the rock. It will dazzle you with its beautiful fluffy yellow plumage; serenade you with a variety of bird song; and wow you with its courtship behavior. But we must say: it's not all romantic! Such is life for a bird that demands and receives nothing less than center stage!

Darwin's Amazing Animals • 2018 • Nature

Tiny Terror — Japanese Tiger Beetle, Japan

The vividly colorful Japanese tiger beetle can be found in and around mountainside villages across Japan. Only a few centimeters in length, they sprint at high speed and catch prey such as ants using their massive jaws. With their dynamic hunting displays, they are literally "tiny terrors". Their larvae are no less fearful. From tiny holes in the ground they ambush passing insects, instantly pulling them in. Watch and be amazed at the hunting scenes of both adult and young.

Darwin's Amazing Animals • 2018 • Nature

Powers of Ten

A scientific film essay, narrated by Phil Morrison. A set of pictures of two picnickers in a park, with the area of each frame one-tenth the size of the one before. Starting from a view of the entire known universe, the camera gradually zooms in until we are viewing the subatomic particles on a man's hand.

1977 • Physics

Meet the tardigrade, the toughest animal on Earth

Without water, a human can only survive for about 100 hours. But there’s a creature so resilient that it can go without it for decades. This 1-millimeter animal can survive both the hottest and coldest environments on earth, and can even withstand high levels of radiation. Thomas Boothby introduces us to the tardigrade, one of the toughest creatures on Earth.

TED-Ed • 2017 • Nature

The God Plant

This documentary seeks to be the ultimate Odyssey of exploration into Cannabis and its uses starting from the formation of the Endocannabinoid system in the simple sea squirt, through to its early uses, the plant's medical benefits and landing at the modern legalisation movements across the Globe. Where the billions generated in tax could be re-invested back into hospitals, roads, fire departments, scientific research, community projects and the list goes on.

2018 • Economics

Part 2

In part 2 under the protection of armed guards, Michael discusses the country's nuclear weapons programme with an army lieutenant, visits a massive tourist resort being constructed on the beach, and embarks on a hike through the stunning landscape.

2/2Michael Palin in North Korea • 2018 • Travel

Part 1

Travelogue series into the notably private nation. Michael arrives in the capital Pyongyang, where he meets the guides who will follow his every move, visits the statues of Kim Il-Sung and Kim Jong-Il, watches propaganda art being created, and asks a local student what they know about the outside world.

1/2Michael Palin in North Korea • 2018 • Travel

Wild France

France is known for its delicious food and wines, great art and architecture and celebrated culture of all kinds. But there’s another side to this popular destination that is not as visible, its wild side. Deep in the French countryside, it is possible for the adventurous to spot brown bears, wild boar, griffon vultures or wolves.

PBS Nature • 2015 • Nature

The Placebo Experiment

Could the power of fake pills be used to treat some of our most common medical complaints? To find out, Dr Michael Mosley embarks on Britain's largest ever trial to investigate the placebo effect. He is heading to Blackpool to gather 117 people suffering from backache - one of the leading types of chronic pain - before trying to treat them with nothing but fake pills and the power of the mind. Working with experts from the University of Oxford, Michael discovers that the placebo effect is more than just a medical curiosity. The brain is actually capable of producing its own drugs, and these can be more powerful than prescription painkillers. Michael's volunteers come from all walks of life, but they have all suffered with bad backs for years and feel their conventional medication isn't up to the job. They include Stacey, who is struggling to keep up with her two energetic daughters, wheelchair user Jim, who longs to be able to get back on a boat, and poker player Moyra, who is looking for a painkiller which doesn't affect her performance. They think they are taking part in the trial of a powerful new painkiller, but their blue and white capsules actually contain nothing but ground-up rice. Can this fake treatment make a real difference? And how will the volunteers react when Michael reveals the truth? Michael also finds out about some remarkable placebo experiments from around the world, including a woman in Oxfordshire who experienced a near-miraculous recovery after undergoing fake surgery to fix her chronic shoulder pain. Plus a team in Lancashire who want to see if the placebo effect can cure a broken heart. And Michael discovers a team in Germany working on a placebo that works even if you know you are taking it, which might improve the lives of transplant patients. Michael also tests this out on himself - attempting to train his own body to respond to a fake treatment - a foul-tasting green drink - as if he were taking actual drugs.

Horizon • 2018 • Brain

THE BODY: Our Remarkable Inner Network

The brain was once thought to be the body's control tower, issuing commands to the other organs. But scientists are discovering that communication flows between all the organs in our bodies. They transmit messages that can boost immunity, improve memory, strengthen bones and even lengthen lifespan. Innovative treatments are being developed to harness the power of this hidden network. But what happens when there's a communication breakdown? We look for clues using the latest technology.

2018 • Health

Fashion's Dirty Secrets

Stacey Dooley travels the world to uncover the hidden costs of the addiction to fast fashion. She sees for herself how toxic chemicals released by the garment industry pollute waterways that millions of people rely on. She witnesses the former Aral Sea, once one of the largest bodies of fresh water, now reduced almost entirely to dust. These are shocking discoveries likely to make you think twice about whether you really need those new clothes.

Stacy Dooley Investigates • 2018 • Environment

The World's Water Crisis

The global water crisis is at an inflection point. How do we price our most valuable resource, while also ensuring access to it as a human right?

Explained • 2018 • Environment

Wonders of the Great Barrier Reef

On the other side of the world under the crystal clear blue waters of the Pacific Ocean lies one of the most enchanting places on the planet. Over ten thousand miles away on the north eastern coast of Australia lies the Great Barrier Reef, one of the natural wonders of our world. It provides shelter to some hidden wildlife sanctuaries that contain some magical marine creatures. Iolo Williams dives deep beneath the surface of the coral sea to discover what state this natural wonder is in. He travels from the extreme swells of the northern part of the reef right down to the cooler pristine corals of the south. He discovers how healthy the Great Barrier Reef really is in some of its key locations to see and find out if there are real signs of hope the reef can survive the threat of global warming.

2018 • Nature

Search for Superfoods in Oita

The latest episode of Medical Frontiers is part of a special series which looks at superfoods around the country. This time we visited Oita Prefecture, where fewer people have died from colorectal cancer over the past 10 years than anywhere else in the country. Research has found that's due to 3 foods the locals eat regularly that help maintain gut health: kabosu citrus fruit, shiitake mushrooms and onions. We'll look at the part these superfoods play in the local diet, share the latest findings on their key components and bring you some healthy, delicious recipes using them.

Medical Frontiers • 2018 • Health

Eye-Opening Treatments

Cataract and glaucoma are eye diseases that progress by aging. Both are severe diseases that can cause blindness, but in Japan, unique treatment methods and causes are being investigated. For cataracts, the world is paying attention to a Japanese doctor who has devised an innovative surgical method which is in just over 3 minutes. And distinctive research is progressing at Japanese universities as to what kind of ingredients can delay the progression of glaucoma. How can we save people from blindness? Explore with us the forefront of Japanese ophthalmic medical care.

Medical Frontiers • 2018 • Health

The Brain Can Be Regenerated

A treatment method that overturns a common sense of the medical community that "the brain cell does not regenerate" has been developed in Japan, and its practical application is imminent. The key to the treatment are "stem cells", which regenerate various body tissues on a daily basis. Japanese researchers have discovered that stem cells, which have been thought to be absent in adult brains, actually exist in small numbers. A therapy that stimulates brain stem cells in an innovative way and regenerates the brain is entering the final phase of a clinical trial.

Medical Frontiers • 2018 • Health

Another Chance for Stroke Patients

A treatment developed in Japan can dramatically improve stroke aftereffects such as paralysis. Until recently, medical experts thought that after 6 months, stroke patients would see little improvement, even with intensive rehabilitation. A treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS, is overturning that idea. Using magnetic pulses to stimulate the brain, it has helped people improve movement and speech, sometimes years after a stroke. We'll also learn how to spot a stroke and help with rehabilitation at home.

Medical Frontiers • 2018 • Health

Back Off, Back Pain!

Chronic lower back pain can be both debilitating and frustrating. The cause is often unclear, making it difficult to treat. As a result, many people give up on medical treatment. Now, researchers in Japan are using new approaches that target the body and the brain to successfully offer relief. One therapy eases pain with injections of saline solution. In another, a simple exercise helps people overcome the fear of pain and promotes recovery.

Medical Frontiers • 2018 • Health

Inside the Perfect Predator

Documentary using groundbreaking computer graphics and close-up photography to reveal the inner alchemy that gives four extraordinary hunters the edge, from the moment they detect their prey through to the vital kill. Soaring above the people of London is the fastest animal on the planet, the peregrine falcon, on a mission to kill for her chicks. Off the coast of South Africa the world's largest predatory fish, the great white shark, has just completed a 7,000-mile journey and is hungry for seal blubber. On the plains of Africa the fastest land animal, the cheetah, struggles to provide for her cubs as her enemies move in. And having survived a drought by entering into a state of suspended animation, the prehistoric Nile crocodile is poised to ambush his dinner.

2010 • Nature

The Loneliest Country In The World

Where is the population in the world the smallest? What countries have the least people? It’s not the size that matters, and with countries, that is often the case. Some of the least populated countries in the world are also the wealthiest in terms of personal wealth and gross national product. And some of the larger nations have problems equally as huge to address. Some of these smaller countries are thinly populated because they are super-difficult to get to or sit in some of the world’s harshest regions. Some simply get by on one or two key industries and foreign aid. Some were used as strategic bases during war time. Some are playgrounds for the rich and famous. And one is reserved for holy activities. Today we take a closer look at the smallest of these nations, in this episode of the Infographics Show, The Ten Least Populated Countries in the World.

The Infographics Show • 2018 • Travel

Scienceploitation

Series Final. For those suffering from a chronic illness or degenerative disease, our rapidly evolving world is offering more promise for a cure than ever before. But with so many treatment options and so much conflicting information available, it's also becoming more difficult for those suffering to make critical treatment decisions.

6/6A User's Guide to Cheating Death • 2017 • Health

The Natural Way

Growing distrust in GMOs, pharmaceuticals and non-natural solutions has pushed families to seek more 'natural' approaches to medical issues - sometimes with fatal consequences.

5/6A User's Guide to Cheating Death • 2017 • Health

Slimming Down

Obesity is one of America's biggest public health concerns. Two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. The pressure to lose weight is intense and many are turning to surgical means to achieve results.

4/6A User's Guide to Cheating Death • 2017 • Health